Top 10 Sharks We’ve Met in Nova Scotia

In honor of 2021 Expedition Nova Scotia,
we are counting down our Top 10 Sharks We’ve Met in
Nova Scotia from previous expeditions to this region.

#10: Nova

Nova was our first white shark we tagged in Canadian waters!
He was found not far from the town of Lunenburg in September 2018.
He was 11 feet and 6 inches long at the time of tagging and approximately 1,180 pounds.
Nova was named in honor of the wonderful people of Nova Scotia who have been
so welcoming and supportive of OCEARCH’s work.

View his track on the OCEARCH Global Shark Tracker: https://www.ocearch.org/tracker/detail/nova

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#9: Scotia

Scotia was a female sub-adult white Shark we met during Expedition Nova Scotia 2019!
She was 11 feet long at the time of tagging and approximately 753 pounds.
Scotia was also named in honor of the supportive people of Nova Scotia.

View her past movements on the OCEARCH Global Shark Tracker: https://www.ocearch.org/tracker/detail/scotia

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#8: Gladee

We met juvenile female white shark Gladee last year near Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
and she has traveled over 7,900 miles since! Gladee was
named in honor of the legend of Gladee’s Canteen, a famous restaurant
run by Gladee and her sister on Hirtle’s Beach. The story
is an example of co-operative and communal spirit that
reminds us of our own collaborative team.

Follow white shark Gladee’s movements on the OCEARCH Global Shark Tracker: https://www.ocearch.org/tracker/detail/gladee

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#7: Hirtle

We met male subadult white shark Hirtle last year and
he has since traveled over 6,600 miles! He was named for Hirtle’s Beach,
near where he was sampled, tagged and released.

You can track Hirtle on the OCEARCH Global Shark Tracker: https://www.ocearch.org/tracker/detail/hirtle

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#6: Breton

Breton is a male adult white shark we met during Expedition
Nova Scotia 2020 off Scatarie Island. At the time of tagging he was 13 ft 3in.
and approximately 1,437 lbs. Breton was named for the wonderful
people of Cape Breton, where he was tagged. His name was
chosen by our partners at SeaWorld, a leader in wildlife rescue,
rehabilitation, and vital ocean health initiative like OCEARCH.

You can track Breton’s movements on the OCEARCH Global Shark Tracker: https://www.ocearch.org/tracker/detail/breton

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#5: Rose

We sampled, tagged, and released female juvenile white shark Rose in October of 2020.
She was named after Rose Bay and has traveled over
6,000 miles in the past year.

Track Rose on the OCEARCH Global Shark Tracker:
https://www.ocearch.org/tracker/detail/rose

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#4: Ironbound

We met male adult white shark Ironbound in October 2019
off of West Ironbound Island. At the time of tagging,
he was 12 ft 4 inch long and 998lbs.

 You can track his movements on the OCEARCH Global Shark Tracker:
https://www.ocearch.org/tracker/detail/ironbound

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#3: Unama’ki 

We met beautiful adult female white shark Unama’ki
off Scatarie Island, Nova Scotia in September 2019. Unama’ki is what the
indigenous Mi’kmaq people of Nova Scotia call Cape Breton,
and it means land of the fog.

You can see Unama’ki’s past movements on the OCEARCH Global Shark Tracker:
https://www.ocearch.org/tracker/detail/unamaki

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#2: Jane

Jane was the first female white shark in history to be SPOT tagged
in Canadian waters. This sub-adult white shark was 10 ft and 521 lbs at the time of
tagging in 2018. She was named in honor of our Fishing Master
Captain Brett McBride’s mother.

You can see Jane’s past movements on the OCEARCH Global Shark Tracker:
https://www.ocearch.org/tracker/detail/jane

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#1: Nukumi

We met our “Queen of the Ocean” Nukumi last October
off Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. She is named after the legendary wise
old grandmother figure of the Native American Mi’kmaq people,
a culture with deep roots in the Canadian Maritime
provinces. Scientists suspect she is over 50 years old.
At the time of tagging, she was 17 ft 2 in. long and over 3,500lbs,
our largest shark sampled and tagged
for our Northwest Atlantic White Shark Study.
Nukumi migrated to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge
in April, likely due to pregnancy, and unfortunately her
SPOT tag hasn’t pinged since. However, data from her PSAT tag
showed us that she did make her way back towards Atlantic Canada
near the Flemish Cap off Newfoundland after heading offshore.

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